{myadvertisements[zone_1]}
Thread Rating:
  • 0 Vote(s) - 0 Average
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
Syrian Gas Attack
#1
I can't figure out what happened, but I DO know a few things.

I don't trust media
media reports AND OTHERS make it appear to have been Syrian Govt (SG)
I do find it hard to believe they'd be that stupid, they didn't really need to and had to know it'd "piss off" many powers.
OTOH does the SG really care, or fully control their military factions?
a Ron Paul cite is declaring "false flag". 


any guesses on USA response?
Reply
{myadvertisements[zone_3]}
#2
I thought this was a pretty good read on it. http://theantimedia.org/media-chemical-attack-syria/
Reply
{myadvertisements[zone_3]}
#3
(04-07-2017, 12:22 AM)StingingNettle Wrote: I thought this was a pretty good read on it. http://theantimedia.org/media-chemical-attack-syria/

info on the past,

didn't seem to say ANYthing about the current issue.

it did say both sides have used chem weapons in the past,




either way, US just struck struck two Syrian Air bases,
IF it were the ones traced to the attack (assuming the attack even had chem weapons rather than destroy ones rebels had on the ground) then it would seem a proper response.

AND no matter who did what, I guess this sends a message to anyone planning on using chem weapons.
Reply
{myadvertisements[zone_3]}
#4
Agreed

There was once a red line drawn but Kerry/Obama were too weak to hold it.

Seems you've installed a real president at last!
Reply
{myadvertisements[zone_3]}
#5
Seems like it has to be a false flag to me.  What would the Syrian government possibly have to gain from using gas?  Meanwhile, anyone who could get ahold of sarin could get it into the area of the battle and release it shortly after Syrian planes drop bombs.  Someone who wants Assad out and is ok with gassing dozens of civilians to make that happen.
Guns don't kill people, the government does.
Reply
{myadvertisements[zone_3]}
#6
(04-13-2017, 05:10 PM)Herring Wrote: Seems like it has to be a false flag to me.  What would the Syrian government possibly have to gain from using gas?  Meanwhile, anyone who could get ahold of sarin could get it into the area of the battle and release it shortly after Syrian planes drop bombs.  Someone who wants Assad out and is ok with gassing dozens of civilians to make that happen.

Up pops the Putin excuse machine!   Dodgy

Right on time!

I doubt Assad made VX on his own. He either got it from Saddam when the Americans invaded or Putin supplied it directly.

So you're a fan of nerve gas attacks on the civilian population then?
Reply
{myadvertisements[zone_3]}
#7
Most intelligent comment comes from Ben Shapiro:

Quote:1. Putin has imperialistic ambitions. As the totalitarian leader of the Russian Federation, Vladimir Putin enjoys a near-monopoly on power in his home country. All major military and diplomatic decisions must first go through the former KGB operative. In order to understand Russian foreign policy, one must first understand the conniving mind of Putin. It’s no secret that Russia’s economy is taking a hit as the price petrol remains stagnant. As any student of history knows, financial turmoil at home leads to social unrest. Recent protests in Moscow are reflective of the Russian people’s anxieties about the future. To maintain control of Russian civil society, Putin needs to project a tough-guy image, one that’s premised on chauvinism. The best way to do this is through military force abroad. Putin’s annexation of Crimea and bombing campaign in Syria have not only helped secure naval facilities and military compounds in the Middle East and Eastern Europe respectively, but these bold actions in full view of the powerless so-called international community have ginned up excitement at home. For Putin, power plays abroad serve to distract the rapidly shrinking middle-class and maintain an aura of invincibility. It goes without saying that Russia’s imperial excursions directly undermine U.S. interests abroad. Not only do they threaten the sovereignty of U.S. allies and NATO partners (particularly in Eastern Europe), but they disrupt global stability, ensuring regional conflicts and sectarian violence for the foreseeable future.

2. Russia is still bitter about losing the Cold War. Putin has made no secret of his bitterness toward the United States as a result of the decades-old Cold War. Here’s what Putin said in April of 2015:

Quote:Above all, we should acknowledge that the collapse of the Soviet Union was a major geopolitical disaster of the century. As for the Russian nation, it became a genuine drama. Tens of millions of our co-citizens and co-patriots found themselves outside Russian territory. Moreover, the epidemic of disintegration infected Russia itself.

For Putin and his hawkish political allies in the Kremlin, the Cold War never ended; the possibility for a renewed Soviet Union lives on in every geopolitical chess piece Russia moves. Indeed, Russia’s interference in Syria (by interference we mean dropping barrel bombs over civilian homes and hospitals) on behalf of its client Assad marks a high-point for Russia’s imperialistic aspirations. Not since the Cold War ended has Russia stationed troops in the Middle East. Today, Russian soldiers, planes, and tanks occupy Syria. Despite recent U.S. military operations in Syria, Russian military personnel haven’t moved an inch. From what it looks, they’re there for the long-haul.


3. Putin uses America and the West as a foils. The West is the perfect enemy for Vladimir Putin. Echoing political talking points often adopted by the “anti-imperialist” wing of the American Left, Putin and his vast network of Kremlin propagandists (see: RT) use modern technology, including social media, to spread canards about the United States. From conspiracy theories about the war in Iraq to sophistry about the U.S. federal system, Russian trolls have engaged in a “disinformation” to trash America’s historical legacy and moral credibility.  Supplying WikiLeaks with hacked material to undermine the American people’s faith in their own electoral system and reveal classified information of immense importance to U.S. national security isn’t what friends do. As the world’s sole remaining superpower, the United States may be the only deterrent against Russia’s expansionist impulses. That’s why the Russians have launched a cyberwar against us. Make no mistake, Russia’s demonization of the United States on state-run media outlets is just the tip of the iceberg. Russian FSB officers, sitting behind computer screens and harassing U.S. diplomats across Europe, are actively working to create a world where America is just another country, not a powerful force for moral good. It’s a long-term and uphill battle, but the Russians are committed to regaining their hegemonic status, if ever there was one.

4. Russia supports causes and groups hostile to the U.S. Moscow’s support for the genocidal Syrian regime isn’t limited to veto votes at the United Nations Security Council. Since the Russian military made its way into Syria in 2015, it has been bombing U.S.-backed and U.S.-trained allies to ensure that their client Assad retains power. The handful of anti-Assad opposition forces we have supported at various points during the Syrian civil war have been targeted by Russian warplanes without mercy. In addition, Russia’s de facto alliance with Iran is designed to push America out of the Middle East and undermine longtime U.S. allies, particularly the Saudis.

5. We tried diplomacy before; it didn’t work. Remember the Russian reset? We saw Hillary Clinton hand foreign minister Sergey Lavrov a red-button with improperly translated Russian writing as a symbol of America’s renewed interest in developing a friendly relationship with Russia. In the years since 2009, Russia has run roughshod on international norms. Foreign minister Lavrov ran circles around Clinton’s State Department successor, Secretary John Kerry, after brokering fake ceasefire agreements between the Syrian regime and opposition forces. After Assad used chemical weapons in Ghouta in 2013, the Obama administration stuck a deal with the Russians ensuring that the Syrian regime would remove all chemical weapons from the country. Clearly, that never happened, despite Russia’s insistence to the contrary. To this day, Russia claims that Assad hasn’t used chemical weapons on his own people. Putin and his chief diplomat Sergey Lavrov are liars. There’s no reason for the United States to trust any commitments or any agreements signed by Moscow. 


In short, the poor Syrians are paying with their blood for Obama, Clinton and Kerry's failure.
Reply
{myadvertisements[zone_3]}
#8
http://original.antiwar.com/justin/2017/...e-is-fake/

The whole article is worth reading, but here is the main point showing the gas/bomb wasn't dropped from a plane as the US claims.

Quote:...

Postol examines the alleged source of the attack: a crater on the road to the north of Khan Shaykun. He locates this crater, via Google Earth, and analyzes the photograph touted as the smoking gun.

“Assuming that there was no tampering of evidence at the crater, one can see what the White House is claiming as a dispenser of the nerve agent.

“The dispenser looks like a 122 mm pipe like that used in the manufacture of artillery rockets.

“As shown in the close-up of the pipe in the crater … the pipe looks like it was originally sealed at the front end and the back end. Also of note is that the pipe is flattened into the crater, and also has a fractured seam that was created by the brittle failure of the metal skin when the pipe was suddenly crushed inward from above.”

Instead of being dropped from a plane, the dispenser was simply placed on the ground and detonated by an explosive device, which then released the sarin gas on a day when weather conditions would ensure maximum lethality.

...
Reply
{myadvertisements[zone_3]}
#9
Quote:1. Putin has imperialistic ambitions.


Guess that explains why he has his military in almost all countries of the world and keeps attacking LOTS
and threatening the few that are not in his sphere


AND has almost all Countries of the world bullied into and controlled by international organizations



Quote:im·pe·ri·al·ism
imˈpirēəˌlizəm/
noun
noun: imperialism
a policy of extending a country's power and influence through diplomacy or military force.




I guess some people SEE things different,
OR USE WORDS DIFFERENT
Reply
{myadvertisements[zone_3]}
#10
(04-13-2017, 05:10 PM)Herring Wrote: Seems like it has to be a false flag to me.  What would the Syrian government possibly have to gain from using gas?  Meanwhile, anyone who could get ahold of sarin could get it into the area of the battle and release it shortly after Syrian planes drop bombs.  Someone who wants Assad out and is ok with gassing dozens of civilians to make that happen.

I am not too confident that there even were really dead children.  The "opposition" in collusion with the MSM has even been caught faking dead bodies.  I believe it was BBC.  It was pretty funny to see in the leaked blooper tape the guys with the fake blood and everything getting back up after given the all-clear.  Purportedly victims of Assad attacks on civilian neighborhoods.  Just like the purported bombed hospitals that showed no damage.

It is all too convenient that this pops up just days after Tillerson saying that Assad's fate is in the hands of the Syrians.
Reply
{myadvertisements[zone_3]}


Forum Jump:


Users browsing this thread: 1 Guest(s)
{myadvertisements[zone_2]}