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The Decline & Fall of America: Reflections on the 1950's versus today
#1
Quote:They (e.g. Uber and Airbnb and the other "sharing economy jobs")  are thriving because the real jobs that used to power the economy are dying.

People are willing to let strangers into the cars and homes for a few hundred dollars a day; that's sad as fuck.

A few generations ago a high school dropout could get a job, buy a house, and support his family on one income. A guy who had a 4 year college degree even in something like English was king. New house in trendy part of town, 9-5 job where he spent his whole career and retired with a pension, new cars ever 2-3 years, kids going to summer camp each year, etc.

Now people who do not have a niche career with a high barrier of entry to competition and a union called an "association" are like starving dogs.
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#2
I loved much about the 1950s while I lived through them, but I suspect that many who glamorize the '50s did not live through them. Some of my most vivid memories of the '50s include blind, legless, terribly scarred and disabled victims of workplace accidents and similar others sitting on the sidewalks ofthe busiest city streets begging for a living. If you think worker's comp took care of the workplace accident victims and begging was just a supplement then you know nothing about the 1950s in Alabama.

I could describe many other awful things about the 1950s such as rampant KKK atrocities, people in my neighborhood who lived in shacks with dirt floors, etc. Don't believe everything you read about the wonderful 1950s.
I dream of an America where a chicken can cross the road without having it's motives questioned.
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#3
(05-12-2017, 11:19 AM)ModestProposals Wrote:
Quote:People are willing to let strangers into the cars and homes for a few hundred dollars a day; that's sad as fuck.

NO, the cynicism that says so is "sad as fuck",

for in REALITY, "room to let" was a common, SUPER COMMON sign at homes all across America from the founding of the Country and well before.

we USED to view that kind of hospitality (even for money) as a GOOD thing!
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#4
Good posts Dave and Inno

This whole nostalgia thing is BS.

I suppose modestproposals would have been just fine with the black folk segregated on the bus, atmospheric nuclear tests and censorship.
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#5
I suppose things were in some ways better and in some ways worse--and how you'd view the 50s depended on where you fell in the system and your priorities.

Most of the former Confederacy was economically depressed for a century or so. I remember reading that real living standards in the South were some 20% lower in 1910 than they had been 50 years before (at the outbreak of the Civil War). While that's unfortunate, that didn't describe the life of MOST Americans in the 1950s. Here in what's now the Rust Belt, there were good-paying jobs for everybody, with pensions, and medical care was affordable. There was no violent crime or ghettos to speak of, no student loan debt, and with mom not having to work outside the house, the man could feel comfortable spending his Thursday evenings defending his spot in the bowling league.
Guns don't kill people, the government does.
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#6
(05-17-2017, 08:47 PM)Herring Wrote: I suppose things were in some ways better and in some ways worse--and how you'd view the 50s depended on where you fell in the system and your priorities.

Most of the former Confederacy was economically depressed for a century or so.  I remember reading that real living standards in the South were some 20% lower in 1910 than they had been 50 years before (at the outbreak of the Civil War).  While that's unfortunate, that didn't describe the life of MOST Americans in the 1950s.  Here in what's now the Rust Belt, there were good-paying jobs for everybody, with pensions, and medical care was affordable.  There was no violent crime or ghettos to speak of, no student loan debt, and with mom not having to work outside the house, the man could feel comfortable spending his Thursday evenings defending his spot in the bowling league.

The snag is was that this was in a post WW2 boom based on a transient situation - all of America's competitors were bombed flat.

Everyone likes to say how much worse America is today - based on what it was like in the '50s. 

They chose not to compare today to what it was like in the '30's.

[Image: Hooverville.jpg]
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#7
True, but the 30s were also a transient situation, after the boom of the 20s. The 30s wouldn't have been nearly so bad except for the mistaken economic policies pursued by the US and European governments.
Guns don't kill people, the government does.
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#8
(05-19-2017, 09:41 PM)Herring Wrote: True, but the 30s were also a transient situation, after the boom of the 20s.  The 30s wouldn't have been nearly so bad except for the mistaken economic policies pursued by the US and European governments.

This is true.

The point I'm making that you can pick your reference date to argue any point.

It's a bit like climate change   Wink
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#9
(05-20-2017, 06:08 AM)andrew_o Wrote:
(05-19-2017, 09:41 PM)Herring Wrote: True, but the 30s were also a transient situation, after the boom of the 20s.  The 30s wouldn't have been nearly so bad except for the mistaken economic policies pursued by the US and European governments.

This is true.

The point I'm making that you can pick your reference date to argue any point.

It's a bit like climate change   Wink

A point that I often make about the Great Depression that is often missed is that yes, there was 25% unemployment, but for those who remained steadily employed had a steady paycheque in the presence of falling prices. The pain of these things is not spread out evenly.
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#10
(05-20-2017, 10:33 AM)brunt Wrote:
(05-20-2017, 06:08 AM)andrew_o Wrote:
(05-19-2017, 09:41 PM)Herring Wrote: True, but the 30s were also a transient situation, after the boom of the 20s.  The 30s wouldn't have been nearly so bad except for the mistaken economic policies pursued by the US and European governments.

This is true.

The point I'm making that you can pick your reference date to argue any point.

It's a bit like climate change   Wink

A point that I often make about the Great Depression that is often missed is that yes, there was 25% unemployment, but for those who remained steadily employed had a steady paycheque in the presence of falling prices. The pain of these things is not spread out evenly.

and for those investing it was a brilliant period
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