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Wuhan Coronavirus - anyone concerned??
#81
Listening to war room pandemic now. It sounds truly horrific in China. They are using convention centers schools and other large facilities to house the sick. Babies born with virus. Talking about the cruise ship in Yokohama 20 tested with virus including 3 Americans. Cruise ship trips canceled, 25,000 flights canceled. All casinos in Mcaw are closed. Hyundai Korea shut down for lack of parts, American manufacturers weeks away. Wuhan, Beiging look like ghost towns. No vaccine available for at least a year. Dr Lee that first reported in China,was put in jail, and then released and praised has caught the virus and died. Got sick Saturday, died today. Big suppression of media in China according to NY Times. . The stats coming out of China completely bogus.....
Monty Python: “There are a great many people in the country today, who through no fault of their own, are sane.”
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#82
Was Dave correct?

[Image: 84474889_540753446532514_753834900104151...e=5EC473B7]
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#83
Can you give a direct link to the article?
Monty Python: “There are a great many people in the country today, who through no fault of their own, are sane.”
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#84
My sources on the ground are telling tales of hell, the real concern is the economic lock up. Thats whats going to "kill" everyone. The first big hit is going to come in the form of AMAZON. 50% of Amazon's sales are cheap crap coming from China. I have word that there is a virtual EBRAKE on ANY PACKAGE coming from China, people in America DON'T WANT TO TOUCH, GET NEAR, HAVE TO HANDLE , HAVE AND CONTACT OR INTERACTION WITH ANY!!!! PACKAGE THAT HAS COME FORM CHINA.

Massive returns are happening, the number one inquiry now is "does it come from China, the next question is, well how oid is the stock? no one wants ANYTHING that recently came form there.

This shit is about to hit every sector and is going to start a global economic melt down. Your going to see shortages everywhere in shit you never even thought about. The world is about to find out why it is a very bad idea to put all your manufacturing in one spot.

The amount of death caused from shortages in medical supply alone will be high.

This is going to get very very bad and most people have absolutely no clue what is happening...if, as by magic the virus could be eliminated right now, it would not matter, there has already been enough damage to wipe out lots of shit.

Basically a slow motion economic nuke has been set off and the blast radius is slowly starting to unfold. It will take time but soon the shadows will burn on the ground
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#85
(02-06-2020, 09:00 PM)doubletroublejim Wrote: Can you give a direct  link to the article?

I don't have a link. I was just sent this image and I'm no virologist.

Lots of contradictory news at the moment:

Initially we were told it would only affect the old and infirm - those with compromised immune systems but that seems not to be the case regarding news of deaths coming out of china via unofficial channels: Lots of young healthy people dying.

The Chinese appear to be under reporting the number of cases and the number of deaths. Lying their asses off as usual. 70 deaths and 3000 cases magically appear in one day.

It's already affecting supply chains. I'm told the Hyundai plant in south Korea has ground to a halt through lack of spare parts.

[Image: china-wuhan-coronavirus-maps-promo-articleLarge-v15.png]

Cruise ship in Japan has the most coronavirus cases outside China

[Image: ae07a338-ad07-4fc3-a695-946b253e7cb3.jpg]

At least 61 passengers aboard a cruise ship in Japan have been infected with the coronavirus, making it the single highest concentration of coronavirus cases outside of mainland China in the whole world.

CNN's Will Ripley spoke to some of the passengers aboard the ship who "sounded downright scared."
The number of cases on the ship tripled overnight from 20 to 61, Ripley reported. 

China’s top court says it was a mistake to quell early “rumors” about the Wuhan virus

China’s Supreme People’s Court has often been at the forefront of the country’s crackdown on “rumors.” In 2013, it introduced sentences of three years for “libelous” posts, including those deemed to be “damaging the national image.” Now, in the midst of the coronavirus outbreak, it’s sending a more tempered message.
Chinese newspaper Beijing Youth Daily this week (link in Chinese) published the story of a local doctor who said he had been summoned by Wuhan police in the night because of information he shared in a medical school alumni group on Dec. 30. He had told the group there were seven cases of pneumonia in a hospital from SARS, a virus that caused an epidemic in China in 2003. He later clarified that the virus in question was still being identified, according to the South China Morning Post. Police made the doctor sign a letter promising not to disclose further information about the outbreak, the Post said, adding that the doctor later became infected himself. On Dec. 31, the city disclosed the presence of 27 pneumonia cases of unknown origin.
On Tuesday (Jan. 28), an article by a judge published on the top court’s social media account (link in Chinese) noted that if law enforcement hadn’t been so quick to take action to quell those rumors, China might be in a better position in its battle against the new virus. The virus has infected (link in Chinese) more than 9,700 people in the country—more than SARS—and killed at least 213. The article said that while some of the information in the messages about the pneumonia cases was inaccurate, on the whole the information was not a fabrication:

Quote:If the public listened to this ‘rumor’ at that time, and adopted measures such as wearing a mask, strict disinfection, and avoiding going to the wildlife market based on panic about SARS, this may have been a better way to prevent and control the new pneumonia … As long as the information is basically true, the publishers and disseminators are not intentionally malicious, and the behavior objectively has not caused serious harm, we should maintain a tolerant attitude towards such ‘false information.’
While not a ruling or an official statement, the article offers clues to the court’s thinking on the topic.

Before the court weighed in, Wuhan authorities hadn’t disclosed what sort of rumors they had taken action against. But after the court’s article, Wuhan police said on social network Weibo (link in Chinese) on Wednesday (Jan. 29) that they had received complaints about misinformation after the city announced the outbreak. Police said they summoned the people in the group because they referred to the cluster of pneumonia cases as being SARS, which was false, and discussed the matter with them but didn’t punish or fine them. The current outbreak was identified on Jan. 7 as a new type of coronavirus, making it a member of the SARS family, but distinct from the strain that caused nearly 800 deaths in 2003.

On social media, many have noted with anger that the Wuhan police announced they had taken action against pneumonia rumors at a time when the city should have been entirely focused on warning and protecting residents. Earlier this month, a lawyer wrote on Weibo that it was “chilling” that “the government now thinks citizens who exchange information that they cannot necessarily verify are the same as those who intentionally spread rumors.” The commentary was shared 5 million times before being deleted.

The top court said that information disclosure is the “cure” for dealing with the situations in which rumors arise, while law enforcement action just treats the “symptoms.” It also tacitly acknowledged what many in China believe—that so-called rumors are often quashed for being inconvenient or for touching on politically sensitive matters, rather than for being untrue:

Quote:Rumors are stopped by transparency. Based on their anxiety about their own safety, there is a certain degree of panic in the face of public health emergencies, which is normal and should be understood. If, at such a moment, relevant information is made public in a timely and comprehensive manner, people’s doubts will naturally be reduced. However, if the information is not disclosed in a timely and transparent manner, it is often easy for the masses to listen to and spread various rumors based on their social interaction circles and their own life experiences… if the rumors are repeatedly confirmed by reality, the masses will naturally choose to believe the rumors in the face of emergencies.
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#86
(02-07-2020, 04:46 PM)andrew_o Wrote: Lots of contradictory news at the moment:

Initially we were told it would only affect the old and infirm - those with compromised immune systems but that seems not to be the case regarding news of deaths coming out of china via unofficial channels: Lots of young healthy people dying.

A 33 year old Chinese doctor died of this Wuhan coronavirus.  Maybe he was under huge stress which damaged his immune system?
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#87
(02-07-2020, 05:24 PM)silverfish Wrote:
(02-07-2020, 04:46 PM)andrew_o Wrote: Lots of contradictory news at the moment:

Initially we were told it would only affect the old and infirm - those with compromised immune systems but that seems not to be the case regarding news of deaths coming out of china via unofficial channels: Lots of young healthy people dying.

A 33 year old Chinese doctor died of this Wuhan coronavirus.  Maybe he was under huge stress which damaged his immune system?

Maybe they beat the hell out of him in prison...

US man wears plastic tent on plane to avoid coronavirus

[Image: BoingBoing-coronavirus-tent-1120.jpg]
 US businessman has tested out his wearable plastic tent on an aeroplane in an attempt to avoid coronavirus.
Rick Pescovitz is the CEO of StadiumPod, which produces plastic tents worn over the torso by sport spectators wishing to avoid the rain.


Hey Ho! Opportunity knocks!
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#88
The boy in the bubble was so ahead of his time...

totally awesome news that the TRUMP white house is going to investigate if it was man made or not...

seeing how the media, the rumormill for the international bankers wants you to think it comes form bats I'd think this be trumpster working against the deepstate, just the fact that its been announced is on the money....

was at hospital today, patent question , have you or anyone you know traveled to china recently, every person was asked this question.
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#89
I just read somewhere that a high percentage of people living in China have COPD, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, due to air pollution, which makes them susceptible to lung infections. This might partly answer Dave's question about why there have been no deaths outside China for this coronavirus.

Long before this coronavirus scare, Chinese people wore face masks in the streets, not because of viral infections but because of air pollution.

Just like the bad air quality of the nineteenth century industrial revolution in English cities predisposed people to tuberculosis, which is an infection of the lungs. Also nineteenth century England was colder than it is now, and there was overcrowding.
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#90
(02-08-2020, 01:16 PM)silverfish Wrote: I just read somewhere that a high percentage of people living in China have COPD, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, due to air pollution, which makes them susceptible to lung infections.
..............................

Thanks silverfish, you come up with good well thought out possible answers!!






 This might partly answer Dave's question ......................

AND I greatly appreciate you recognizing my comment as a QUESTION.
it's always frustrating for my personal life that everyone always seems to take my QUESTIONS as STATEMENTS (or worse).

such as Andrew's wrong assumption here:

Quote:andrew
Was Dave correct?
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