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Democrat candidates are all clowns
#1
You must have seen the clip with audio circulating. Too funny!

Joe slept and stumbled through the whole thing

Lairwatha and Bernie went for each others throats in public.

It's like as if they know they've lost even before they start the election.





This was typical CNN playing their usual manipulative game. The Democrat candidates are now learning the hard way why Trump often attacks CNN. 

CNN seems convinced Warren won the debate (as per their plan) but as an outside observer I think Warren looked worse. Petulant & Nasty.
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#2
Yes, highly amusing. Will only get more so as the primaries and dim convention come up. The dim debates are a bore though. One dim pundit said it was like looking at cold oatmeal.
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#3
I can't understand how they have become so detached from reality
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#4
(01-17-2020, 04:48 AM)andrew_o Wrote: I can't understand how they have become so detached from reality


it might be easier to understand if you notice,........


they STILL WIN MANY ELECTIONS some how!!!










(hint, the population of voters is also quite often "detached from reality" in many many ways)
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#5
I work with a lot of very smart engineers who routinely vote left regardless of the candidate's present and past behavior. The same goes for the conservatives I work with. I don't believe they are detached from reality so much as they are voting for their respective teams. I have shown many of them the math, and demonstrated the absurdity of voting for a candidate pre-selected by interest groups absolutely in conflict with the their own personal beliefs. Even the couple of engineers I convinced still vote. Go team, go!
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#6
Right, political beliefs are based mostly on emotion not reason. You can have well reasoned positions and for the most part it means next to nothing to someone on the opposing side.

....and yes, I identify with the deplorables, the flag waving and military glorification are hard for me to take though. The enemy of my enemy is my friend I guess. Trump just seems to upset and often call out all the right people.

....and he's a hell of a fighter. A political bruiser one might say.
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#7
(01-17-2020, 03:32 PM)mason Wrote: I work with a lot of very smart engineers who routinely vote left regardless of the candidate's present and past behavior. The same goes for the conservatives I work with. I don't believe they are detached from reality so much as they are voting for their respective teams. I have shown many of them the math, and demonstrated the absurdity of voting for a candidate pre-selected by interest groups absolutely in conflict with the their own personal beliefs. Even the couple of engineers I convinced still vote. Go team, go!

Yes, I believe that. It's the football analogy. They treat politics like a team sport and vote for the 'home side' regardless.
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#8
(01-17-2020, 05:05 PM)andrew_o Wrote:
(01-17-2020, 03:32 PM)mason Wrote: I work with a lot of very smart engineers who routinely vote left regardless of the candidate's present and past behavior. The same goes for the conservatives I work with. I don't believe they are detached from reality so much as they are voting for their respective teams. I have shown many of them the math, and demonstrated the absurdity of voting for a candidate pre-selected by interest groups absolutely in conflict with the their own personal beliefs. Even the couple of engineers I convinced still vote. Go team, go!

Yes, I believe that. It's the football analogy. They treat politics like a team sport and vote for the 'home side' regardless.

.

so you should know Andrew,

IS it like this in other Countries that have LOTS of political parties too?
and ones that come and go?


I always thought our "problem" (if it is) was from a TWO PARTY SYSTEM.
you make it sound like "teamism",
which has little to do with a system forced to only have two parties..............

curious
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#9
(01-17-2020, 09:06 PM)DaveGillie Wrote:
(01-17-2020, 05:05 PM)andrew_o Wrote:
(01-17-2020, 03:32 PM)mason Wrote: I work with a lot of very smart engineers who routinely vote left regardless of the candidate's present and past behavior. The same goes for the conservatives I work with. I don't believe they are detached from reality so much as they are voting for their respective teams. I have shown many of them the math, and demonstrated the absurdity of voting for a candidate pre-selected by interest groups absolutely in conflict with the their own personal beliefs. Even the couple of engineers I convinced still vote. Go team, go!

Yes, I believe that. It's the football analogy. They treat politics like a team sport and vote for the 'home side' regardless.

.

so you should know Andrew,

IS it like this in other Countries that have LOTS of political parties too?
and ones that come and go?


I always thought our "problem" (if it is) was from a TWO PARTY SYSTEM.
you make it sound like "teamism",
which has little to do with a system forced to only have two parties..............

curious

We have four main parties now, it used to be five. The Reform and Progressive Conservatives merged to become the Conservatives.

The Liberals and Conservatives are the traditional two parties, and have very strong cores of voters (particularly the Conservatives). The other two parties are NDP (ultra socialists), and Bloc Quebequois (Quebec separatists).

The ultra left/unionists/Leninists are hard NDP, and left/SJW are Liberal. There is a soft middle that goes from one to the other. 

The Conservatives are pretty well "left" from a US standpoint - there is no rugged individualism up here, just debates about how much overly excessive government intervention we should have. There is also a soft middle that goes between Liberal and Conservatives.

The Bloc are only in Quebec and wax and wane as separatism comes and goes. They had been declining for years, but sprung back a bit the last election, but that was more a vote against the reigning Liberals than pro-Bloc.

But there is definitely a core of hard support for each, as voters choose their teams.

And there is a definite rural/urban split just like in the US, but more pronounced. For instance, Greater Toronto contains about 1/6th of Canada's total population, and so dictates an oversized portion of the policy. And we have no real Senate equivalent where each province has an equal say at a different level of government.
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#10
In answer to Dave, yes most definitely.

For example I know people back in the UK that vote Labour because their dads and granddads did - this is a 100 year aspect of the labour movement. Old habits die hard.

But things have changed! Labour in the UK, much like the Democrats in the USA and many other countries I could name, have gone so out on a limb that they've alienated much of the working class. In the recent election in the UK, the north of England traditional labour stronghold has voted for a Conservative Prime Minister who attended Eton! This is their school uniform:

[Image: 17th_Duke_of_Alba_at_Eton.jpg]

I kid you not!   Big Grin  

This was not because they've suddenly fallen in love with the Tories, but because the Labour Party in the UK has transformed into this weird blend of ultra PC/woke/gender-bender/pro-Muslim/anti-Christian/climate-crazy/pro-EU cult. Supported by an elitist clique of actors and TV people with green hair and facial piercings. 

They have made themselves unelectable.


The 2016 election result in the USA wasn't anything much to do with Trump himself (although he might feel otherwise) but was a revolt against an elitist supposedly leftist class who sneer at people who get their hands dirty earning a living. It is the very antithesis of what America stands for. The deplorables pushed back.

Take the current crop of Democrat candidates: I think for example they all support open borders and free medical care for all comers. I mean that is plain crazy! - not only will it bankrupt the USA it will undermine the very people they claim to represent. 

I think Sanders in particular has missed a trick. Back in 2015 he was against open borders and had a policy that was pretty much the same as Trump's is now: Tighten border controls to prevent illegals undermining the wage rates to the bottom rung of America's working class. Trump has implemented this and the result is massive job creation and an uplift in average wage rates. It's obvious. So why did Bernie go back on this policy? Who got to him?

[This isn't new in the USA. Bill Clinton was elected with communist Chinese financial backing (that was quickly buried by a compliant media https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/1996_Unite...ontroversy ) and as soon as he was elected he got the Chinese into the WTO and allowed them to beggar the USA with intellectual property theft on a massive scale. He also gave them the technology to launch multistage rockets, supposedly for launching telecom satellites, but of course this was immediately used to give them ICBM capability. ]
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