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Hitler's Revenge
#1
In regards to the hatreds and divisions in America now,  I remember a saying many years ago from Peter Brimlow who called it "Hitler's Revenge", which for me answers the how and why of our situation today.

https://www.brusselsjournal.com/node/2660
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#2
There's a lot of truth in that!

Good post, thanks.

I think the same applies to the ending of colonies - it was a knee jerk reaction after the war because they were seen to be somehow unfair. But ultimately the end of colonialism lead to the ruin of Africa.
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#3
Who were the "Political Elite" that backed the changed immigration policy? or better who pulled the strings on the "Political Elite"?

any ideas Mr. Andrew?
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#4
(08-06-2018, 09:44 PM)cbeatty Wrote: Who were the "Political Elite" that backed the changed immigration policy? or better who pulled the strings on the "Political Elite"?

any ideas Mr. Andrew?

I believe it was Ted Kennedy who sponsored the 1965 bill.

I looked it up, it was called the Hart-Cellar act. Ted Kennedy lobbied and promoted it in the Senate, but did not create the bill.
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#5
(08-06-2018, 10:57 PM)doubletroublejim Wrote:
(08-06-2018, 09:44 PM)cbeatty Wrote: Who were the "Political Elite" that backed the changed immigration policy? or better who pulled the strings on the "Political Elite"?

any ideas Mr. Andrew?

I believe it was Ted Kennedy who sponsored the 1965 bill.

I looked it up, it was called the Hart-Cellar act.  Ted Kennedy lobbied and promoted it in the Senate, but did not create the bill.

That surprises me. I wonder, at that time, why Ted Kennedy would care?

I asked Andrew the question, because over the years I have read or heard many references that it was put forth by Andrews favorite people to dilute and keep the prevalent Americans of the time in check. Seems like something Andrew could get behind.
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#6
(08-06-2018, 09:44 PM)cbeatty Wrote: Who were the "Political Elite" that backed the changed immigration policy? or better who pulled the strings on the "Political Elite"?

any ideas Mr. Andrew?

I haven't a clue: I don't get invited to those parties.
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#7
(08-10-2018, 06:01 PM)andrew_o Wrote:
(08-06-2018, 09:44 PM)cbeatty Wrote: Who were the "Political Elite" that backed the changed immigration policy? or better who pulled the strings on the "Political Elite"?

any ideas Mr. Andrew?

I haven't a clue: I don't get invited to those parties.

no clue that you would admit to ...............
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#8
(08-15-2018, 01:11 AM)cbeatty Wrote:
(08-10-2018, 06:01 PM)andrew_o Wrote:
(08-06-2018, 09:44 PM)cbeatty Wrote: Who were the "Political Elite" that backed the changed immigration policy? or better who pulled the strings on the "Political Elite"?

any ideas Mr. Andrew?

I haven't a clue: I don't get invited to those parties.

no clue that you would admit to ...............

If only!

I like canapes and champagne
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#9
The solution to the previous problem will eventually become the new problem.

Quote:After Kennedy’s assassination that November, Congress began debating and would eventually pass the Immigration and Naturalization Act of 1965, co-sponsored by Representative Emanuel Celler of New York and Senator Philip Hart of Michigan and heavily supported by the late president’s brother, Senator Ted Kennedy of Massachusetts. During Congressional debates, a number of experts testified that little would effectively change under the reformed legislation, and it was seen more as a matter of principle to have a more open policy. Indeed, on signing the act into law in October 1965, President Lyndon B. Johnson stated that the act “is not a revolutionary bill. It does not affect the lives of millions….It will not reshape the structure of our daily lives or add importantly to either our wealth or our power.”

https://www.history.com/topics/us-immigr...since-1965
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#10
(08-15-2018, 03:47 PM)StingingNettle Wrote: The solution to the previous problem will eventually become the new problem.

Quote:After Kennedy’s assassination that November, Congress began debating and would eventually pass the Immigration and Naturalization Act of 1965, co-sponsored by Representative Emanuel Celler of New York and Senator Philip Hart of Michigan and heavily supported by the late president’s brother, Senator Ted Kennedy of Massachusetts. During Congressional debates, a number of experts testified that little would effectively change under the reformed legislation, and it was seen more as a matter of principle to have a more open policy. Indeed, on signing the act into law in October 1965, President Lyndon B. Johnson stated that the act “is not a revolutionary bill. It does not affect the lives of millions….It will not reshape the structure of our daily lives or add importantly to either our wealth or our power.”

https://www.history.com/topics/us-immigr...since-1965

Wow, Just take out the  words "not" and  "add" to Johnson's statement and you have the truth.
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