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Wikileaks Creating Secrecy Tax
#1
Great read.


Quote:Want to Know Julian Assange’s Endgame? He Told You a Decade Ago

AMID A SEEMINGLY incessant deluge of leaks and hacks, Washington, DC staffers have learned to imagine how even the most benign email would look a week later on the homepage of a secret-spilling outfit like WikiLeaks or DCLeaks. In many cases, they’ve stopped emailing altogether, deleted accounts, and reconsidered dumbphones. Julian Assange—or at least, a ten-years-younger and more innocent Assange—would say he’s already won.

Read the entire article here: https://www.wired.com/2016/10/want-know-...=social_fb
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#2
I've long thought that pulling the plug on the Internet would be a good plan for the security agencies. Stand alone data bases with no internet connection . I suspect though that a lot of security Breaches are physical rather some magic done online to access it.
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#3
A "security agency" can operate like that, with completely "air-gapped" systems.
A political party cannot.  Their entire purpose is to connect to people, both to learn what people are thinking and to get people to think what the party wants them to.  Disconnecting themselves is counter to their goals.
Guns don't kill people, the government does.
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#4
Yeah, air gaps are pretty common.

Incidentally....

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#5
New update

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#6
I had posted this in a separate thread.  I'll eliminate that and post it here:


Apparently the Ecuadoreans, whose London embassy he's been holed up in, have cut off his internet.
This comes as WikiLeaks has been dumping more and more content embarrassing to Hillary Clinton.


This morning, a Wikileaks account blasted out three long strings of characters.  The suggestion is that these are encryption keys, and form a kind of dead man switch.
Meaning, they were set up somewhere to automatically be sent out if Assange failed to log in somewhere for longer than X.  Without internet, he couldn't log in.

If Assange is in fact in trouble, the remaining WikiLeaks staff will soon announce where the files are that these strings of characters unlock.  Presumably this is the entire trove of leaked documents.

If Ecuador has simply cut off his internet, they will face a dilemma when he's soon back online with a cellular connection.  Do they want him to leave the embassy?  Or were they simply bowing down to pressure from the US government?
Guns don't kill people, the government does.
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#7
I love it.  You can't shut him off.

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#8
On an unrelated note, the state department offered a foreign aid package with Ecuador that is larger than all of the south and Central American counties combined
"Queen Killiary" strikes again through John Kerry...

Still thinkin you live in the land of the Free?
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#9
Word is the next batch of data from Wikileaks will point the finger at John Kerry.

This could get very nasty!  :-)

Popcorn in the microwave....

As I understand it, it's not the Ecuadoreans who have cut off his internet, it's the British. The Ecuadoreans want to give him citizenship but the Brits will arrest him (do America's bidding) if he leaves the embasssy.
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#10
No, Ecuador admits they cut it off, because Wikileaks "published a wealth of documents, impacting on the US election campaign."

https://www.rt.com/usa/363234-ecuador-as...wikileaks/

Since this won't prevent WikiLeaks from publishing, I wonder whether Ecuador will do anything further, or be content in that they're not enabling it.
Guns don't kill people, the government does.
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