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capitalistic excess: Starbucks saturation
#1
Here's a factoid that grabbed my attention:  the average Starbucks in the US has 3.6 other Starbucks stores within a 1-mile radius.  

And that's up from 3.2 five years ago, so they've been consistently filling in more stores even from the 3.2 level.


Quote:"Seventy-five percent of Starbucks locations in California (Starbucks' largest U.S. market representing approximately 20 percent of its U.S. footprint) now have a store within a one-mile radius," Strelzik said. "There are now 3.6 Starbucks locations within a one-mile radius of the typical Starbucks in the U.S. relative to 3.3 and 3.2 stores in 2014 and 2012 respectively."


https://www.cnbc.com/2017/08/09/each-sta...e-bmo.html
Guns don't kill people, the government does.
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#2
Meet the new Starbucks.
Same as the old Starbucks -- and right next door!







da bear
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#3
We have very few here.

In general, the NZ coffee drinking public consider Starbucks substandard American crap, so we buy elsewhere. Most are one-off boutique places
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#4
When I am trying to assess the state of America's wealth nowadays, coffee is one of the things that make me paranoid.

Coffee is an imported item, and we have to compete with other nations to get good coffee.

IMHO, the overall quality of coffee available in the United States has been in noticeable decline for three decades.

I assume that somebody, somewhere, still produces the good stuff, but we rarely get any if it.  Somebody else must be more wiling to pay more than us.  

Perhaps that is a sign that America is becoming poorer.

Starbucks burns their beans and seems to oil them heavily before grinding.  That suggests to me that their beans never were all that great.  I can buy a package/ can of Folgers or Cafe Bustelo for little more than the cost of a cup and one refill at Starbucks.  That package/can will make 90 cups of coffee at home.

This is one of my topics that I like to rag on, so perhaps I have said this here before.

oly
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#5
They are competing with themselves.  At least they don't have pissed off franchise owners to deal with. 



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#6
(08-14-2017, 02:44 AM)StingingNettle Wrote: They are competing with themselves.  At least they don't have pissed off franchise owners to deal with. 




Apparently, that's about right.
Guns don't kill people, the government does.
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#7
(08-13-2017, 09:25 PM)oly2059 Wrote: When I am trying to assess the state of America's wealth nowadays, coffee is one of the things that make me paranoid.

Coffee is an imported item, and we have to compete with other nations to get good coffee.

IMHO, the overall quality of coffee available in the United States has been in noticeable decline for three decades.

I assume that somebody, somewhere, still produces the good stuff, but we rarely get any if it.  Somebody else must be more wiling to pay more than us.  

Perhaps that is a sign that America is becoming poorer.

Starbucks burns their beans and seems to oil them heavily before grinding.  That suggests to me that their beans never were all that great.  I can buy a package/ can of Folgers or Cafe Bustelo for little more than the cost of a cup and one refill at Starbucks.  That package/can will make 90 cups of coffee at home.

This is one of my topics that I like to rag on, so perhaps I have said this here before.

oly

Starbucks is a large chain...it beats other chains as far as coffee goes, and the coffee is not that bad considering. But if you want really high end coffee you have to pay. Most large cities will have a roaster that offers a wide assortment of beans. Ask them for the good stuff - which often starts at around $20/lb. And if it is the flavor range that you like, you will likely enjoy it more than Starbucks, Tim Hortons, or folders.
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#8
(08-15-2017, 02:15 PM)tdogg Wrote:
(08-13-2017, 09:25 PM)oly2059 Wrote: When I am trying to assess the state of America's wealth nowadays, coffee is one of the things that make me paranoid.

Coffee is an imported item, and we have to compete with other nations to get good coffee.

IMHO, the overall quality of coffee available in the United States has been in noticeable decline for three decades.

I assume that somebody, somewhere, still produces the good stuff, but we rarely get any if it.  Somebody else must be more wiling to pay more than us.  

Perhaps that is a sign that America is becoming poorer.

Starbucks burns their beans and seems to oil them heavily before grinding.  That suggests to me that their beans never were all that great.  I can buy a package/ can of Folgers or Cafe Bustelo for little more than the cost of a cup and one refill at Starbucks.  That package/can will make 90 cups of coffee at home.

This is one of my topics that I like to rag on, so perhaps I have said this here before.

oly

Starbucks is a large chain...it beats other chains as far as coffee goes, and the coffee is not that bad considering. But if you want really high end coffee you have to pay. Most large cities will have a roaster that offers a wide assortment of beans. Ask them for the good stuff - which often starts at around $20/lb. And if it is the flavor range that you like, you will likely enjoy it more than Starbucks, Tim Hortons, or folders.

I think there would be a market for a string of higher end coffee joints.  

Starbucks is basically middle brow -- but overpriced, overexposed, and overexpanded.

Or, on the low end open a chain of cut rate coffee shops/cafes, with prices 1/2 or 2/3 of what Starbucks charges.  Open 'em up in small towns, down-and-out suburbs/exurbs, and malls/strip malls that USED to be good...

If you can't box out Deep Box aka formerly known as YUGE BOX, you can box 'em IN.








da bear

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#9
I don't really buy coffee out.
At home, we drink "Joe" from Trader Joe's--$5.99 for a 14-oz. can
At work, I drink Donut Shop or Newman's Own in Keurig pods.
If I do want coffee away from home, I look for a Dunkin Donuts.
Guns don't kill people, the government does.
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#10
(08-17-2017, 07:50 PM)Herring Wrote: I don't really buy coffee out.
At home, we drink "Joe" from Trader Joe's--$5.99 for a 14-oz. can
At work, I drink Donut Shop or Newman's Own in Keurig pods.
If I do want coffee away from home, I look for a Dunkin Donuts.

I know that I have become "financially allergic" to purchasing coffee "to go" from anywhere.

Started a year or two before I retired.

One of the office supervisors at my workplace insisted 'coffee is supposed to be a cheap drink'.

When I go to coin shows in Chicago (three hour drive or ride), some C-store might get lucky and sell me one.  But I might just make a thermos-full of coffee for the trip if I am in a private vehicle for the round trip.  Doesn't work so well on the train.

oly
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